Mission Statement:

Mission Statement: Quiet Spirit writes for those who seek a closer relationship with God.















Friday, March 20, 2009

Gethsemane

(Luke 21:37; 22:39)

A wealthy citizen of Jerusalem permitted Jesus the use of his private garden when the Master visited the city. Our Lord made use of the garden, called Gethsemane each day during the week of Passover.

The garden must have been a serene place. Jesus surely found his favorite spot there. Jesus bid most of the disciples who escorted Him to stay in one area. He requested those to whom He was closest to follow him further into the garden. As the foursome came to another spot, the Teacher asked the three others to wait and pray for him. He went on a ways and fell on His knees and began to pray.

Why did Christ chose to go to the garden to pray? Could He have wanted to feel close to the Father? We know He was agonizing over what lay ahead for Him. He could have prayed anywhere else in the city—in the upper room,at the temple,or any where he chose.

The upper room was offered to Peter and James for a few hours. Those who were there could have had a time of community prayer. The Temple fell under the control of the priests, who were plotting to kill Him.

Jesus chose the one place where He could be alone with his Father. A place where the two of them had spent quality time together.

2 comments:

  1. Perhaps He wanted to be in a natural setting, built primarily by the Father. It also provided the solitude He needed.

    Blessings,
    Susan

    ReplyDelete
  2. Dear QS,

    Do you know what the name "Gethsemene" means? Olive press. That garden was the place where olives were grown and pressed. Olives were dumped into a large stone pit, then a huge, flat stone was laid on top of them. As days passed other large stones were stacked on top of that one. Slowly, slowly the olives were crushed until every drop of oil was pressed out of them.

    What a beautiful picture of Christ's sacrifice for us.

    Jean

    ReplyDelete

I would be honored to hear what you think about this.